2016 survey of certificate of completion of training (CCT) holders’ career progression

31 Jan 2017

This is the eighth annual survey reporting the experiences of and outcomes for certificate of completion of training (CCT) holders within 1 year of gaining their CCT in the medical specialties in the UK.

The survey results from a collaboration between the Royal College of Physicians, London (RCP) Medical Workforce Unit and the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board (JRCPTB). This unique survey has monitored changing outcomes for CCT holders across the different medical specialties since 2009, during a period of considerable change and uncertainty in the NHS.

Summary

  • In total, 63% of certificate of CCT holders held a substantive post, which is consistent with the early years of the survey and an improvement on recent years.
  • For the third consecutive year, and unlike other medical sub-specialities, a higher proportion of genitourinary medicine CCT holders were in locum posts or unemployed (54.6%) than were in consultant posts (18.2%).
  • Of CCT holders who were in a substantive post, 48.2% had been offered mentoring and an encouraging 85.3% had taken this up.
  • CCT holders of white British ethnic origin applied for fewer posts, were more likely to be shortlisted and were more likely to be offered a consultant post, compared with CCT holders of other ethnic origins.
  • Overall, 62.6% of CCT holders who trained in general medicine reported ‘acting up’ during their training to undertake a post-take ward round with their consultant simply watching to give feedback, and 97.6% recommended this to other trainees. This opportunity should clearly be made available to all trainees in general medicine.
  • There has been a gradual fall over the past 6 years in perceptions of how well CCT holders feel trained in their speciality.
  • If they had their training period again, 94% of CCT holders reported that they would train again in their specialty and 85% reported that they would train again in general medicine.

PDF icon Post CCT survey 2016.pdf